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Experiments and Curiosities I

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Analog Distortion

Fifty Weeks of Work: Machines in Space

Growing up in a suburb of Houston, so close to Space Ceneter and Ellington Field, it was nearly impossible not to have an interest in space and NASA. To go from watching shuttle launches on TV to being connected to astronauts on Instagram and other online platforms has been such a curious and wonderful thing.

Steven has done these kinds of typologies before, but this series of illustrated NASA satellites feels fitting…machines in space. You can follow along here, or on his Instagram.

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Week II
Cygnus Orbital-1
NASA / Oribital Sciences

Marking the first private spacecraft to resupply ISS, Cygnus Oribital-1 launched on the Antares rocket from a facility in Virginia. It delivered 1,300 lbs. of non-critical gear, was loaded with trash and was relaunched and burned up over the Pacific Ocean.

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Week I
Voyager I & II
NASA / JPL

Voyager I and II were twin spacecraft whose primary mission was the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn. Among other discoveries, they found active volcanoes on a moon of Jupiter, and the details of Saturn’s rings. Voyager II continued on to Uranus and Neptune, the only craft to visit those planets. (NASA)

Curiosities: Library of Dust by David Maisel

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These photographs are a part of David Maisel’s book titled Library of Dust. It documents canisters of patient remains at Orgeon State Hospital. The stigma of mental illness left many of these individuals forgotten and abandoned, even after death. The Oregon State Insane Asylum, it’s name upon opening in 1883, amassed 3,500 canisters of unclaimed remains from 1913 until 1971—a result of displaced burial grounds. Unfortunately, the remains were shuffled around and stored poorly. Exposed to moisture their contents leaked and their surfaces decayed. Maisel documented the transformed canisters, along with other found objects. A beautiful series no doubt, filled with bright mineral tones and textures, but one filled with deep sadness.

(Referenced A haunting memorial in ‘Library of Dust’)

Observed: Christian Herdeg

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These delicate, geometrical neon sculptures are the work of Christian Herdeg. He was the first artist in Switzerland to begin working with these tubes, a medium predominately used commercially. Working with chemists in the seventies, Herdeg created over two hundred fluorescent powder mixtures. You can see the resulting palettes in his pieces, a demonstration of the combination of science and art. His work revolves around the properties of light, and how we see and perceive them. From my understanding, it strives to be technical not spiritual.

Curiosities: Crystallized Works by Tyler Thrasher

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These crystallized curiosities are the work of Tulsa based artist Tyler Thrasher. Growing crystals takes weeks, and over time he has learned to control and manipulate the process. However, the crystals can sometimes grow out of hand and these mistakes, so to speak, often yield some of Thrasher’s favorite pieces (Venison Magazine, Amber Imrie-Situnayake). This combination, creature and crystal, feels like a perfect union. You can view more on hisportfolio, and purchase limited runs from his shop.