Archives

Curiosities

Curiosities: Examples of Penmanship & Typography from the BHL

Biodiversity_Type_06

Biodiversity_Type

Biodiversity_Type_02

Biodiversity_Type_04

Biodiversity_Type_07

Biodiversity_Type_03

Biodiversity_Type_08

Biodiversity_Type_05

A consortium of botanical and natural history libraries, the Biodiviersity Heritage Library is working towards digitizing their collections of public domain journals and books. It is an endless resource of images and information that can be used freely, depending on its copyright status. Delving through the collection led to an unexpected discovery of many beautiful examples of penmanship and typography.

※ The images above were edited for DC, originals are below.

Purple Magnolia
Melanocephalis
Flabellatus
Gemellata
Vesicatoria
Xyridaceae
Penguin
Der Penguin
Le Penguin

Biol. bentr.Am
Wild Sweet Pea
Field Museum
The Sea
The Goosebeek’d Whale
Dahlias
Pigeon Blondinette Noir
Noir Pigeon Satinette

Experiments and Curiosities I

experimentsandcuriosities01

Analog Distortion

Curiosities: Library of Dust by David Maisel

davidmaisel_libraryofdust02

davidmaisel_libraryofdust06

davidmaisel_libraryofdust05

davidmaisel_libraryofdust09

davidmaisel_libraryofdust04

davidmaisel_libraryofdust07

davidmaisel_libraryofdust01

davidmaisel_libraryofdust08

davidmaisel_libraryofdust03

These photographs are a part of David Maisel’s book titled Library of Dust. It documents canisters of patient remains at Orgeon State Hospital. The stigma of mental illness left many of these individuals forgotten and abandoned, even after death. The Oregon State Insane Asylum, it’s name upon opening in 1883, amassed 3,500 canisters of unclaimed remains from 1913 until 1971—a result of displaced burial grounds. Unfortunately, the remains were shuffled around and stored poorly. Exposed to moisture their contents leaked and their surfaces decayed. Maisel documented the transformed canisters, along with other found objects. A beautiful series no doubt, filled with bright mineral tones and textures, but one filled with deep sadness.

(Referenced A haunting memorial in ‘Library of Dust’)

Curiosities: Crystallized Works by Tyler Thrasher

tylerthrasher01

tylerthrasher02

tylerthrasher03

tylerthrasher05

tylerthrasher04

tylerthrasher06

These crystallized curiosities are the work of Tulsa based artist Tyler Thrasher. Growing crystals takes weeks, and over time he has learned to control and manipulate the process. However, the crystals can sometimes grow out of hand and these mistakes, so to speak, often yield some of Thrasher’s favorite pieces (Venison Magazine, Amber Imrie-Situnayake). This combination, creature and crystal, feels like a perfect union. You can view more on hisportfolio, and purchase limited runs from his shop.

Curiosities: Marion Catusse

marioncatusse01

marioncatusse04

marioncatusse06

marioncatusse03

marioncatusse07

marioncatusse02

marioncatusse05

A familiar intersection, art and science. Marion Catusse experiments and uses a number of interesting materials and subjects in her pieces. Minerals, stones, and bones combine with resin, inks, and agar. From what I understand (Her biography is in French), she calls the shapes in her pieces, cells. At times they are subtlely paired with small items—other times however, they are larger in scale, overtaking the object. Taking a look at her instagram, she has some really beautiful things in store for 2016. I’ll definitely be following along.