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Illustration

Observed: JR au Louvre

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Last week, French street artist JR completed his latest piece at the Musée du Louvre. He is known for his large-scale photographic pastes where the importance and meaning of the work lies in the locale. This particular piece opened with a 24-hour event over the weekend that included workshops, films, and music/visual performances—most notably for me, Nils Frahm and Ólafur Arnalds. From a certain vantage point, the artwork blends the iconic pyramid into the facade of the Pavillon Sully behind it. JR au Louvre will remain on view until June 27th.

Violaine and Jérémy, a Paris based studio, designed and illustrated the poster for the exhibition and daylong event. It’s such a well executed piece, and a work of art in itself. It seems as much care has gone into their online presence, and is a great representation of how designers should be showcasing their work. It has quickly become one of my favorite portfolios.

Fifty Weeks of Work: Machines in Space

Growing up in a suburb of Houston, so close to Space Ceneter and Ellington Field, it was nearly impossible not to have an interest in space and NASA. To go from watching shuttle launches on TV to being connected to astronauts on Instagram and other online platforms has been such a curious and wonderful thing.

Steven has done these kinds of typologies before, but this series of illustrated NASA satellites feels fitting…machines in space. You can follow along here, or on his Instagram.

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Week II
Cygnus Orbital-1
NASA / Oribital Sciences

Marking the first private spacecraft to resupply ISS, Cygnus Oribital-1 launched on the Antares rocket from a facility in Virginia. It delivered 1,300 lbs. of non-critical gear, was loaded with trash and was relaunched and burned up over the Pacific Ocean.

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Week I
Voyager I & II
NASA / JPL

Voyager I and II were twin spacecraft whose primary mission was the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn. Among other discoveries, they found active volcanoes on a moon of Jupiter, and the details of Saturn’s rings. Voyager II continued on to Uranus and Neptune, the only craft to visit those planets. (NASA)

Observed: Jamie Mills

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An artist, illustrator and educator, Jamie Mills uses unique perspectives and subdued colors in his work. The first two images are from his series Forest where trees are encased and on display for the public. They were created for Tiny Pencil, an artist led anthology for works in graphite. You can find some originals and prints for purchase in his shop, and see his other work, inlcuding collaborative efforts, on his portfolio.

Observed: 무나씨 Moonassi

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The artist behind Moonasi, Daehyun Kimn, uses only black ink for her illustrations. There is no hidden significance in this, only that she she finds it simply, just enough. I find both her drawings and the description of her work refreshingly succinct. The expressionless face of her subjects was borrowed from old Buddist paintings, and she finds that it is perfect to conceal there feelings. The focus of her illustrations is on their gestures alone.

Moonasi sells her illustrations as originals, hand drawn editions, and prints. You can sign up on her site to receive updates, if you would like to purchase her work.

Curiosities: Olivia Knapp

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Although I’ve chosen to share previous works of a more simple variety, Olivia Knapp’s crosshatch style is delightfully intricate. She has a new series completed called Prehensility, and it is on view at the Hellion Gallery in Portland. Her drawing style is influenced by European line engravings from the 16th to the 18th centuries, and she utilizes methods called “line to dot” and “dot and lozenge.” The result is extraordinary, and the subject matter surreal. Personally, hands and eyes are my two favorite objects that she draws. Her portfolio and blog are both worth a look. She shares many up-close images which show you the incredible detail if you aren’t able to view it in person.