Archives

Observed

A Stopgap as Design Curiosities becomes Curiosity and Curiosities

curiosityandcuriosities

In an effort to bring more unique and thoughtful content to our site we’ve been discussing and working on what changes we need to make. As those changes are taking place behind the scenes, and to let you know that we are still here, you can find us at Curiosity and Curiosities. We are sharing visual content daily as a stopgap for this transition.

Observed: JR au Louvre

JRauLourve01

JRauLourve02

JRauLourve06

JRauLourve05

JRauLourve03

JRauLourve04

Last week, French street artist JR completed his latest piece at the Musée du Louvre. He is known for his large-scale photographic pastes where the importance and meaning of the work lies in the locale. This particular piece opened with a 24-hour event over the weekend that included workshops, films, and music/visual performances—most notably for me, Nils Frahm and Ólafur Arnalds. From a certain vantage point, the artwork blends the iconic pyramid into the facade of the Pavillon Sully behind it. JR au Louvre will remain on view until June 27th.

Violaine and Jérémy, a Paris based studio, designed and illustrated the poster for the exhibition and daylong event. It’s such a well executed piece, and a work of art in itself. It seems as much care has gone into their online presence, and is a great representation of how designers should be showcasing their work. It has quickly become one of my favorite portfolios.

Observed: Eric Lacombe

ericlancombe01

ericlancombe02

ericlancombe03

ericlancombe04

ericlancombe05

ericlancombe06

ericlacombe00

ericlacombe000

Graphic designer and artist Eric Lacombe’s work focuses on the melancholy that goes along with feelings of fear, anxiety and sadness. Something about his style reminds me of Stephen Gammell’s illustrations for Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, but Lacombe’s work is decidedly different. His portraits are dark and rich, and have depth and feel dimensional. The dour-looking subjects of his latest exhibition, The Weight of Silence, are tormented hybrids and creatures dealing with the, ” indefinable perceptions anticipating death.” It is currently on view at the Last Rites Gallery in NYC until the 16th of April.

Observed: Noémie Goudal

noemiegoudal05

noemiegoudal04

noemiegoudal01

noemiegoudal02

noemiegoudal03

noemiegoudal06

noemiegoudal07

noemiegoudal08

noemiegoudal09

Noémie Goudal has created a strange mix of fiction and reality in her photographs. Some are hand-made objects while others are digitally manipulated structures from real photographs that she prints. Goudal doesn’t hide these fabrications, and on study and inspection they stare at you. Even though you can see the deceptions, they are based in reality. Perception is a funny thing sometimes.

Observed: Christian Herdeg

christianherdeg01

christianherdeg02

christianherdeg03

christianherdeg04

christianherdeg05

christianherdeg06

christianherdeg07

These delicate, geometrical neon sculptures are the work of Christian Herdeg. He was the first artist in Switzerland to begin working with these tubes, a medium predominately used commercially. Working with chemists in the seventies, Herdeg created over two hundred fluorescent powder mixtures. You can see the resulting palettes in his pieces, a demonstration of the combination of science and art. His work revolves around the properties of light, and how we see and perceive them. From my understanding, it strives to be technical not spiritual.