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Observed

Observed: Christian Herdeg

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These delicate, geometrical neon sculptures are the work of Christian Herdeg. He was the first artist in Switzerland to begin working with these tubes, a medium predominately used commercially. Working with chemists in the seventies, Herdeg created over two hundred fluorescent powder mixtures. You can see the resulting palettes in his pieces, a demonstration of the combination of science and art. His work revolves around the properties of light, and how we see and perceive them. From my understanding, it strives to be technical not spiritual.

Observed: Urban Symmetry by Zsolt Hlinka

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Urban Symmetry is a clever series by Zsolt Hlinka that documents buildings on the banks of the River Danube. What you see, however, is not quite a true reality. Photographed and isolated from their surroundings, these buildings are halved and reflected making them perfectly symmetrical. The new fictitious buildings look otherworldly, especially when placed on their uniform backgrounds. You can see more of Urban Symmetry on Hlinka’s portfolio, along with some of his new work called Central Illisions.

Observed: Johnny Abrahams

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Looking at these high-contrast paintings is almost enough to make your head spin. They are the work of Johnny Abrahams, and are part of his current series—a study of lines and the exclusion of all other design elements. The shapes and shadows make the paintings seem fluid, even more so I’m sure, when viewing them in person.

Observed: Faculty Department

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A personal photography project by Justin Chung, Faculty Department documents homes and workspaces of creatives. They are not just tours of spaces however, they are something more. Chung, inspired by the work, was most intrigued by how spaces and people’s daily lives contributed to productivity and happiness. The preface of the book contains the details of development, from photographs of Chung’s workspace to typeface choice. It is something that is atypical, but is very fitting given the book’s subject. They have recently released the overrun copies of the limited edition book, you can find them at Faculty Department.

※ The photographs of Faculty Department were taken by Nicole Shultz for Design Curiosities.

Observed: A Century of Artifice

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Constantly, I’m drawn to the work of designers who are also artists. Michael Cina (Art | Design) sits in this overlap, also finding himself in a collaboration with Ghostly International, a long-term partnership that is not often common in design. You can see Cina in his work at Ghostly, but the converse is just as true. Recently, in conjunction with VSCO, Cina has produced a limited edition book to document 100 album covers and concept art, titled A Century of Artifice. “My hope is that it will give the viewer a unique glimpse into the diverse work I have done in the last six years with Ghostly. It is really a special thing when an artist and company can work hand in hand… I feel that the sum is greater than the parts, and this book will show the thought that I put into each project.”

※ The photographs of A Century of Artifice were taken by Nicole Shultz for Design Curiosities.